A few reminders of the Russian dictator’s track record as President Trump heads to his summit in Finland.

Last week, U.S. president Donald Trump gave his assessment of Russian president Vladimir Putin, with whom he will be meeting on July 16: “Putin’s fine.”

Listed below is a small sampling of reasons to think otherwise.

 

Assassinations

The Kremlin has been accused of a series of murders abroad. But since Putin first took office as president in 2000, Russia itself has been the scene of numerous assassinations targeting dissidents, reporters, human rights activists, and opposition politicians. The death toll among journalists alone reached 28 last year, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists. Here are some of the lowlights of this legacy.

  • Igor Domnikov, journalist, July 16, 2000
  • Eduard Markevich, journalist, September 18, 2001
  • Valeriy Ivanov, journalist, April 29, 2002
  • Sergey Yushenkov, opposition politician, April 17, 2003
  • Aleksey Sidorov, journalist, October 9, 2003
  • Paul Klebnikov, U.S. journalist, July 9, 2004
  • Anna Politkovskaya, journalist, October 7, 2006
  • Magomed Yevloyev, journalist, August 31, 2008
  • Stanislav Markelov, human rights lawyer, January 19, 2009
  • Anastasiya Baburova, journalist, January 19, 2009
  • Natalya Estemirova, human rights activist, July 15, 2009
  • Sergey Magnitsky, anticorruption lawyer, November 16, 2009
  • Gadzhimurad Kamalov, journalist, December 15, 2011
  • Akhmednabi Akhmednabiyev, journalist, July 9, 2013
  • Boris Nemtsov, opposition politician, February 27, 2015
  • Nikolay Andrushchenko, journalist, April 19, 2017
  • Dmitriy Popkov, journalist,…

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