SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Microsoft, Facebook and more than 30 other global technology companies on Tuesday announced a joint pledge not to assist any government in offensive cyber attacks.

Silhouettes of mobile users are seen next to a screen projection of Microsoft logo in this picture illustration taken March 28, 2018. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration

The Cybersecurity Tech Accord, which vows to protect all customers from attacks regardless of geopolitical or criminal motive, follows a year that witnessed an unprecedented level of destructive cyber attacks, including the global WannaCry worm and the devastating NotPetya attack.

“We recognize that we live in a new world,” Microsoft President Brad Smith said during a speech on Tuesday at the RSA cyber security conference in San Francisco. “We’re living amidst a generation of new weapons, and where cyberspace has become the new battlefield.”

Smith, who led efforts to organize the alliance, said the devastating cyber attacks in 2017 demonstrated the need for the technology sector to “take a principled path toward more effective steps to work together and defend customers around the world.”

It was not clear whether any companies would change their existing policies as a result of joining the accord.

Microsoft did not immediately respond to a series of questions about the accord, including whether the company had previously participated in government-sponsored offensive cyber operations or how the pledge would impact compliance with lawfully obtained surveillance orders in the United States or elsewhere.

Silhouettes of mobile users are seen…

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