Google had pulled out of China in 2010 citing free speech restrictions from China’s authoritarian government.

Posted on August 1, 2018, at 8:00 a.m. ET


Google is planning to launch a censored version of its search engine in China, a country the company pulled out of in 2010 citing free speech restrictions from China’s authoritarian government, a new report published by the Intercept claims.

According to the report, Google has been working on a censored version of its search engine as an Android app for the Chinese market since spring 2017 and could launch it in the country in the next six to nine months after it gets approval from Chinese officials.

Internet access in China is heavily restricted by China’s Communist Party, which is headed by President Xi Jinping. Here are a few examples of what the Chinese government blocks: websites that talk about the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, books like George Orwell’s Animal Farm and 1984 that show authoritarian regimes in a negative light, social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and news organizations like the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the BBC.

The Intercept report claims that Google’s search app in China will automatically identify and filter websites banned by the Chinese government. The company will put a disclaimer on its search results page saying that “some results may have been removed due to statutory…

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